Impact Of Iraq Kuwait War Essay Intro

Causes and Effects of the Persian Gulf War Essay

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Causes and Effects of the Persian Gulf War

The Persian Gulf War, often referred to as Operation Desert Storm, was perhaps one of the most successful war campaigns in the history of warfare. Saddam Hussein, leader of Iraq, invaded Kuwait in 1990. In 1991, after weeks of air strikes, US ground forces entered Iraq and Kuwait and eliminated Iraqi presence in 60 hours.

Why Would Iraq invade Kuwait?

Kuwait supplies much of the world’s oil supplies, and when Hussein invaded Kuwait, he controlled 24% of the world’s oil supplies (O’Hara). Though this is a good reason, it is not the only one. Iraq’s real excuse for annexing Kuwait was that he believed that Kuwait was producing more oil than it was supposed to, taking out of Iraq’s…show more content…

Just before the United States began air strikes over Iraq, Hussein decided to test his new weapon on the city of Iraq. Little damage was caused, but it just was another excuse for the United States to attack (NSA).

What happened after the Persian Gulf War?

“Because the world would not look the other way…tonight, Kuwait is free.” Those were the words of President Bush after the end of Operation Desert Storm. Though free, Kuwait was a war torn country. While Iraqi troops were retreating, they set fire to many of the Kuwait oil fields causing a constant blaze. Along with a defeat, Iraq has to accept strict cease-fire terms set on by the UN. They include No-Fly-Zones on the north and south borders of Iraq, frequent military inspections, destroy all chemical and ballistic missiles in its possession, and stop any nuclear weapons programs (Brown).

Though only about 367 Americans died in this war, about 160 of them were from friendly fire, which is when someone is killed by their own country on accident. This is because of the new “high-tech” weapons where at times, only infrared light can be read, making it impossible to decipher which is friend or foe (Friendly Fire).

After the war, many of the soldiers who fought developed what is known as Gulf War Syndrome. Speculation is that the cause may be chemical or biological weapons used, but nothing has ever been confirmed (Brown).

Towards the beginning

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The Causes and Effects of the the Iran-Iraq War Essay

888 WordsFeb 16th, 20144 Pages

Iran-Iraq War, An Iraqi soldier carrying an AK-47 assault rifle during the Iran-Iraq War.
[Credit: © Jacques Pavlovsky/Corbis](1980–88), prolonged military conflict between Iran and Iraq during the 1980s. Open warfare began on Sept. 22, 1980, when Iraqi armed forces invaded western Iran along the countries’ joint border, though Iraq claimed that the war had begun earlier that month, on September 4, when Iran shelled a number of border posts. Fighting was ended by a 1988 cease-fire, though the resumption of normal diplomatic relations and the withdrawal of troops did not take place until the signing of a formal peace agreement on Aug. 16, 1990.

The roots of the war lay in a number of territorial and political disputes between Iraq and…show more content…

Iran’s counterattacks using the revolutionary militia (Revolutionary Guards) to bolster its regular armed forces began to compel the Iraqis to give ground in 1981. The Iranians first pushed the Iraqis back across Iran’s Kārūn River and then recaptured Khorramshahr in 1982. Later that year Iraq voluntarily withdrew its forces from all captured Iranian territory and began seeking a peace agreement with Iran. But under the leadership of Ruhollah Khomeini, who bore a strong personal animosity toward Ṣaddām, Iran remained intransigent and continued the war in an effort to overthrow the Iraqi leader. Iraq’s defenses solidified once its troops were defending their own soil, and the war settled down into a stalemate with a static, entrenched front running just inside and along Iraq’s border. Iran repeatedly launched fruitless infantry attacks, using human assault waves composed partly of untrained and unarmed conscripts (often young boys snatched from the streets), which were repelled by the superior firepower and air power of the Iraqis. Both nations engaged in sporadic air and missile attacks against each other’s cities and military and oil installations. They also attacked each other’s oil-tanker shipping in the Persian Gulf, and Iran’s attacks on Kuwait’s and other Gulf states’ tankers prompted the United States and several western European nations to station warships in the Persian Gulf to ensure the flow of oil to the rest of the world.

The oil-exporting capacity of both

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