Civ 5 Intro Speech Essay

  • Racism Exposed in Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness
  • Racism in The Color of Fear
  • Racism in William Shakespeare's Othello
  • The Hard Times of Blacks in the South in the 1940's
  • Derrick Bell's "Space Traders"
  • Racism in To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Zeitoun
  • Pleasantville Racism Paper
  • Racism in Harlem by Langston Hughes
  • Prejudice in Heart of Darkness: Racism is a Relative Term
  • "The Lemon Orchard", by Alex La Guma: Exploring Stable Meaning, the Perversion of Nature, and Discursive Communities
  • Police Prejudice and Racism
  • Attitudes, Racism and Culture
  • Overcoming Racism
  • In what ways does one's race/ethnicity shape one's life-chances in contemporary society?
  • Race, Racism and My Community
  • Racism and Sexism in Toni Morrison's Sula
  • Racism in Othello by William Shakespeare
  • Racism: The Implicit Associations Test
  • Poets Write Feelings of Racism in Still I Rise In Harlem by Langston Hughes and Stil I Rise by Maya Angelou
  • Racism: A Social Problem
  • The Effects of Scientific Racism on Black Women
  • The Artificial Nigger: Truths Behind Racism
  • A Conversation about Race: A Documentary by Craig Bodeker
  • Racism and Slavery
  • Racism, Prejudice, and Discrimination in the Workplace
  • Racism in the Media: Misrepresentation of Minorities
  • Huck Finn: The Twisting Tides Of Portrayal - Racism
  • Racism In The NFL
  • Racism in Disney Movies
  • Huck Finn And Racism
  • Du Bois vs. Cox
  • Chinua Achebe's Heart of Darkness and Racism
  • Racism in Shakespeare's Othello
  • Racism and Discrimination in the US
  • Phoenix's Hardships and Racism in A Worn Path
  • Racism Revealed: Hurricane Katrina
  • Racism in Song of Solomon, Push and Life of Olaudah Equiano
  • Racism in Tracking
  • Black on Black Racism
  • racism
  • Racism in Disney Films
  • Why Is Institutional Racism so Important to Our Understanding of Racial Inequalities in Britain Today?
  • Racism on College Campuses
  • Institutionalized Racism, Group Thinking and Jury Bias
  • The Effects of Racism in Education
  • Racism in Our Society
  • Prejudice and Racism in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • How Country Lovers and the Gold Cadillac Tackle Racism
  • Racism in Ernest Gaines's A Lesson Before Dying
  • Different Types of Racial Discrimination
  • Racism Kills Thoughts in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  • Origins of Racism
  • Blazing Saddles Research
  • Racism In The Movies
  • Racism Exposed in Fences, by August Wilson
  • Sexism, Prejudice, and Racism in Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird
  • Racism in William Shakespeare’s Othello
  • Racism in Health-care
  • Definition Essay: Racism
  • Racism in the Criminal Justice System
  • Racism in Deadly Unna by Phillip Gwynne
  • Racism and Sexism in the Bluest Eye
  • The Existance of Racism
  • Aspects of Racism
  • Why Is Shakespeares Othello Still Relevant in Todays Audiences?
  • Racism in the Sports Pages
  • Racism
  • Still I Rise by Maya Angelou Literary Analysis Essay
  • A Soldier's Play
  • Bell Hooks' A Revolution of Values: The Promise of Multicultural Change
  • Huckleberry Finn ( Huck Finn ) - Racism
  • Protesting Against Racism at the 1968 Olympics
  • Fences, by August Wilson
  • Racism in America Today
  • Racism in Family Guy Supports Stereotypes
  • Lies My Teacher Told Me
  • Immunizing Society Against Discrimination
  • Hines Ward: Experiences with Racism
  • Women Voicing Their Pain
  • Racism, Revenge, the War without Mercy, and the Decision to Use the Atomic Bomb
  • The Acts of Racism In The 20th Century
  • Taking a Look at Environmental Racism
  • The Stories That Changed My Perspective on Racism and Ethnicity
  • Country Lovers vs. The Gold Cadillac
  • Why Racism Is an Issue in Need of Solution
  • Racism in the Unites States
  • Two Colors One Land
  • How Is Racism Presented in the Novel of Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry?
  • Feature Article Racism- to Kill a Mockingbird Etc
  • Scientific Racism and Antisemitism
  • Racism, Racial Profiling and Segregation in America
  • Divine Wind - Racism
  • Holocaust: A Result of Racism

Introduction Strategies    
Excluding scientific and technical writing (which often has pre-established formats), most other topics lend themselves to a variety of introductory gambits. Suppose the assignment is to write a literary analysis of Vladimir Nabokov’s novel Lolita. Below are several different ways to start that essay. Please note that not all introductions would be appropriate for one particular thesis or approach. But having a repertoire of openings at our disposal often helps lead us to insights we didn’t know we had.

Begin with a quotation
Although this approach can be overused, it can be very effective when you have an appropriate quotation. That quotation may relate directly to the subject or it may be only indirectly related (and thus require further explanation). Do not force a quotation into this spot; if an appropriate quotation is not available, select another method.

  • "The novel Lolita," the critic Charles Blight said in 1959, "is proof that American civilization is on the verge of total moral collapse" (45). The judgment of critics and readers in subsequent years, however, has proclaimed Lolita to be one of the great love stories of all time and one of the best proofs that American civilization is still vibrant and alive.
  • "Lolita, light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin, my soul" (11). These opening lines of Lolita reveal the essence of Humbert’s complexity and compulsion, his saving grace and his damning passion.

Begin with a concession
Start with a statement recognizing an opinion or approach different from the one you plan to take in your essay.

  • Many critics have pointed to the unrelenting word games and puns throughout Lolita as proof that Vladimir Nabokov’s major concern has always been language and art. Although these subjects certainly loom in all his works, a close examination of Lolita reveals that morality — the way people treat each other — is just as major a concern for him as language and art.

Begin with a paradox
A paradox is a seeming self contradiction.
 

  • By 1959 Vladimir Nabokov’s novel Lolita had been banned in several cities as pornographic. Today it is required reading not only in literature courses but also in philosophy courses that explore the nature of love. Since its publication, the novel’s subject has been recognized to be love, not lust; art, not perversion.

Begin with a short anecdote or narrative

  • When the original movie version of Lolita was released in the early 1960s, Sue Lyon, the young actress who starred as the provocative "nymphet" of the title, was judged too young to be allowed to see the movie in the theater.

Begin with an interesting fact or statistic

  • Joseph Conrad and Vladimir Nabokov — two acknowledged masters of English prose — were not even native speakers of English. Conrad’s native tongue was Polish; Nabokov’s, Russian.

Begin with a question or several questions that will be answered in the paper

  • How could a book now acknowledged as a masterpiece not only of fiction but also of English prose have been banned when it was published? How could a novel that dealt with love and art be thought of as pornographic? Why would a society so mindful of free speech as America ban any book in the first place?

Begin with relevant background material
Background material should be presented concisely and should be clearly related to your thesis. A rambling discussion of material only remotely related to your main point will confuse and bore your readers.

  • Although he was born in Russia and lived for many years in England, Germany, and France before coming to America in 1941, Vladimir Nabokov is now considered one of the great American novelists of the 20th century. This opinion, however, is not based solely on his mastery of English prose. His novel Lolita has been said to have captured the essence of American life in the 1950s better than any novel written by a writer born in this country.

Begin by stating a long-term effect or effects without immediately stating the cause

  • It caused howls of protest from the guardians of public morality in the 1950s. Indirectly it helped bring about both artistic and personal freedom in the 1960s. Today it is a recognized classic of art and thought — Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita.

Begin with an analogy

  • Like a hurricane that brings fear and panic along with its powerful winds, uprooting trees and disrupting belief in an all-merciful God, so the novel Lolita swept across America in the 1950s, bringing fear and panic that pedophilia would be loosed on the land. Instead, the novel, like a hurricane, blew over trees of thought that were not deeply rooted in American experience, exposing their gnarled premises while helping to clear the way for the artistic freedom of the 1960s.

Begin with a definition of a term that is important to your essay
Avoid simple dictionary definitions. Create an expanded definition that explains how the term applies to your topic and essay.

  • Every few years the ugly charge of "pornography" is aimed at some novel or movie. Never was the term more inappropriately used than in the case of Lolita, yet the taint of that word still lingers in the minds of many when they hear the book’s title. What exactly is "pornography" that it should stir such feelings and be so hated? The problem, of course, is that no one can agree on what pornography actually is. That it has something to do with sex seems clear; beyond that, there is a chaos of opinion. When the small-minded or special-interest definitions are pushed aside, however, we are left with D.H. Lawrence’s provocative definition: pornography is anything that "does dirt on sex." By that definition, Lolita is the opposite of pornography — it is a celebration of sex and love.

 

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